FAQ

  1. How often should I impregnate my shoes?
  2. Do patent leather shoes also need to be impregnated?
  3. How can I best care for my patent leather shoes?
  4. Is there a difference between suede and nubuck leather? Or are they just different words for the same thing?
  5. Oh goodness – a stain! How do you go about tackling a shoe polish stain?
  6. How did people used to care for shoes before Bama came along?
  7. What was the first shoe polish made from?

1. How often should I impregnate my shoes?
In order to keep your shoes looking good as new, you should impregnate them before wearing them for the very first time. Wait until the shoes are dry and apply a second time – only then will impregnation products have an optimum effect. As for how often you should impregnate shoes, that all depends on the weather and how frequently they’re worn. Are they your favourite pair, the one you frequently put on? In that case, you should reach for your impregnation care product on a frequent basis. Your shoes are thus always protected from water, salt and dirt – unsightly stains will never bother you again. In general: Bama Protectors provide extra protection for up to 15 rainy days.

2. Do patent leather shoes also need to be impregnated?
No, that’s something you needn’t worry about because patent leather is naturally impermeable – so your shoes are perfectly protected against wetness.

3. How can I best care for my patent leather shoes?
We all know the drill. A fine, unwanted layer of dust always manages to settle on patent leather shoes. In order for your pair to regain its former glory every time, you need the right care products. But standard shoe polishes often leave behind unsightly smears on your shiny shoes. And that’s why we’ve developed a special range of shoe care products. Take Bama Patent Lotion, for example: it stops the patent leather layer drying out, keeps it supple and ensures long-lasting and brilliant shine.

4. Is there a difference between suede and nubuck leather? Or are they just different words for the same thing?
Nubuck and suede are also known as full-grain leather and buckskin. However, there are slight differences in their production: suede is produced using the inner side of the dermis – which is why you can clearly distinguish the soft and supple fibres. Conversely, nubuck is fashioned using the hairy side. The leather is tanned to create the typically fine, velvety and short fibres.

5. Oh goodness – a stain! How do you go about tackling a shoe polish stain?
Whoops, there it goes: a drop of shoe polish hasn’t fallen on the shoe, but next to it. And there are a number of ways to remove that unsightly stain. The best course of action, however, depends on the type of material that has been stained.

Important: the stain must be dealt with as quickly as possible! The little blighters can best be removed while they’re still wet. Therefore, it’s sometimes advisable to dab a little water on them to ensure they stay damp.

As most shoe care products contain dyes and/or pigments, it’s often impossible to get them out of fabrics such as wool or suede. So anyone who wants clean clothing in addition to well-kept shoes should be especially careful when polishing the latter.

6. How did people used to care for shoes before Bama came along?
Even over a hundred years ago, people wanted their shoes to look nice and clean, and presentable. The first shoe care product, however, was still a somewhat sticky affair. It was made from a simple solution of water, sugar, vinegar and black dye. The range of products on offer today, however, makes it a whole lot easier to keep our shoes looking clean.

7. What was the first shoe polish made from?
The first shoe polish was a mixture of sugar, vinegar, black dye and water.